Featured Post

The Great Sex Robot Debate at Ideacity

Monday, July 24, 2017

Washington Post Hides Own Scoop To Promote Dems’ Narrative



When the highest ranking Democrat in Washington takes a public swipe at Hillary Clinton and undermines the “Russia won the election for Trump” narrative you’d think it would be pretty big news...
“When you lose to somebody who has 40 percent popularity, you don’t blame other things — Comey, Russia — you blame yourself,” Schumer said. “So what did we do wrong? People didn’t know what we stood for, just that we were against Trump. And still believe that.”
However, the Washington Post didn’t appear to find this infighting between top Democrats as worthy of a headline or even the lede in their account of the Schumer slam. Even more astounding: Schumer gave the quote to WaPo directly in an exclusive interview...

Liberals overhaul citizenship test

...In the draft version, the reference to barbaric cultural practices is gone, as is the inclusion of getting a job as one of the responsibilities of citizenship.

Instead, the proposed new guide breaks down the responsibilities of citizenship into two categories: voluntary and mandatory.

Voluntary responsibilities are listed as respecting the human rights of others, understanding official bilingualism and participating in the political process.

Obeying the law, serving on a jury, paying taxes, filling out the census and respecting treaties with Indigenous Peoples are mandatory.

“Today, Canadians, for example, can own their own homes and buy land thanks to treaties that the government negotiated,” the draft version says. “Every Canadian has responsibilities under those treaties as well. They are agreements of honour.”...

Sunday, July 16, 2017

Leftist complains: "Help! Trump Stole My Wife!"


It's hard to tell whether this is sincere or if someone is trolling a leftist website. My bet is sincere:
Dear Dana:

My wife and I were big Hillary Clinton supporters. We went to rallies, canvassed the neighborhood to drum up other supporters, and even hosted a Hillary Wins The Presidency party on election night. Needless to say, we were both devastated when Trump won. For several weeks after the election, as though someone close to us had died, we grieved. We cried, lost sleep, felt angry and anxious and fearful for the future.

By March, I’d come to accept that Trump was the President and it was time to move on. My wife, however, is still really upset. She will not stop watching the news, screams at the TV every time she sees Trump’s face, and only wants to talk politics all the time. She seems edgy and aggressive, and blames Trump for every little thing that goes wrong in her daily life. I’m doing my best to be patient with her, but her unwillingness to move on is starting to drain me. I miss my wife. What can I do to help her move on?

Signed,

Trump Stole My Wife
Read the reply here

Friday, July 14, 2017

"I’m through wasting my time on people who are more interested in ideas than feelings"

The problem with this woman is she made the classic mistake of not aborting her children once she found out that they were males. Now she's stuck with two misogynist children.
The proof of their misogyny being that they refuse to admit that their non-violence towards women only helps to enable rape culture, because they think it gives them deniability in being part of the rape culture problem.
Or, as an alternative explanation, the woman who wrote this is out of her fucking mind:

...if it’s impossible for a white person to grow up without adopting racist ideas, simply because of the environment in which they live, how can I expect men not to subconsciously absorb at least some degree of sexism? White people aren’t safe, and men aren’t safe, no matter how much I’d like to assure myself that these things aren’t true.

My sons won’t rape unconscious women behind a dumpster, and neither will most of the progressive men I know. But what all of these men share in common, even my sons, is a relentless questioning and disbelief of the female experience. I do not want to prove my pain, or provide enough evidence to convince anyone that my trauma is merited. I’m through wasting my time on people who are more interested in ideas than feelings, and I’m through pretending these people, these men, are safe.

I love my sons, and I love some individual men. It pains me to say that I don’t feel emotionally safe with them, and perhaps never have with a man, but it needs to be said because far too often we are afraid to say it. This is not a reflection of something broken or damaged in me; it is a reflection of the systems we build and our boys absorb. Those little boys grow into men who know the value of women, the value that’s been ascribed to us by a broken system, and it seeps out from them in a million tiny, toxic ways...


The Next Right-Wing Populist Will Win by Attacking American Higher Education


...The bias is undeniable: Left-wing professors and students predominate, while conservative thought is often ignored, sometimes marginalized, and occasionally forbidden by oppressive speech codes or threatening mobs. Political correctness and identity politics rule many campus student groups. And college life reliably promises socialization into progressive ideas and sexual mores, as well as a confrontation with the most relaxed attitudes toward drinking and drugs. 

Nor do universities themselves recognize the validity and potency of their critics’ charges. In covering the Pew survey, InsideHigherEd laid blame for the shift in Republican attitudes at the feet of “perceived liberal orthodoxy and political correctness in higher education.” This is typical of how these discussions go. There are only “perceived” problems. The evidence of how fields have drastically changed and how the professoriate has drifted radically leftward since the 1990s is ignored...

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Omar Khadr is a killer and despite what the media says, Canadians are right to be disgusted with the Trudeau sellout to him

Whether or not he killed US Army Medic Christopher Speer, the crime for which the scion of an al Qaida family pleaded guilty, is immaterial to why most Canadians are revolted by the Trudeau government's $10.5 Million payout and apology to Omar Khadr. Having taken up arms against a coalition, of which Canada was a part, that fought the Taliban in Afghanistan, and building IEDs of the type that killed scores of Canadian soldiers, Khadr is without question a terrorist and traitor.

But as his defenders try to cast doubt on this element of the saga, let's address whether or not Omar Khadr is in all probability a killer.

Khadr's advocates say his confession and guilty plea were extracted by torture and coercion.

Khadr certainly endured forms of mistreatment while incarcerated. But after returning to Canada, where he was no longer fearful of abuse, Khadr said, not as his proponents claim, that he did not throw the grenade which killed Speer, but that he's unsure if the grenade he threw was the one that ended the medic's life. But Khadr does admit having thrown a grenade at the Americans. So at the very least he tried to kill Speer and his comrades. But the evidence becomes more conclusive.

In 2002, in the Khost Province of Afghanistan, US forces engaged with an al Qaeda/Taliban stronghold. After an attempt to negotiate a search of the building was met with gunfire from the stronghold, a firefight broke out and then the Americans called in a airborne bomb strike.

Following the bombing raid, Speer a media, and other US Delta Force soldiers approached the building to search for dead and wounded. As the approached, a grenade was lobbed from within the building which fatally wounded Speer.

Now here's the easy logic to follow. Khadr said he threw a grenade. From reports of the post-bombing conflict, only one grenade was thrown. It therefore follows to reason that the grenade thrown by Khadr was the one which ended Speer's life.
Omar Khadr's own account of throwing the grenade that
killed Sgt Speer - given in Canada to The Toronto Star'sMichelle Shephard 

Khadr would have been in custody and treated by Americans the same regardless of whether Canadian officials had failed to inform him of his rights during questioning. It is not Canada's fault that Omar Khadr became a terrorist.  It is the fault of his reprehensible family, in particular Khadr's father Ahmed, who was al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden's bag man and who took the young Omar along with him on on his nefarious exploits. It is therefor not Canada which owes compensation and an apology to Khadr, but his own awful progenitors.

An Egyptian/Palestinian family, the Khadrs have a lengthy history of exploiting Canadians, with the assistance of Liberal Prime Ministers. Ahmed Khadr was was incarcerated in Pakistan in 1995 for his involvement in a terrorist attack on the Egyptian Embassy in that country. Following advocacy on the senior Khadr's behalf  by the Canadian Arab Federation, Prime Minister Jean Chretien intervened and secured his release.

Following his return to Canada, Ahmed Khadr embarked on a campaign of fundraising and assistance for Osama bin Laden. To what extent he helped raise the funds that were used in the 2001  9/11 terror attacks that resulted in the murder of three thousand Americans is unclear. But it remains a distinct possibility that Canada's Liberal government was an unwitting accessory to that atrocity.

It was at the time of the 9/11 attacks that Ahmed had brought his son Omar to Afghanistan, later abandoning him there as he went off at bin Laden's bequest. Two years later, Ahmed would be killed in a shootout with Pakistani security forces.

Is Omar Khadr a victim? Certainly. of his family, and very possibly, he was a victim of rape and sexual abuse by al Qaeda commander Abu Laith al-Libi. Charlie Manson also was an abused child, but that doesn't mean he deserves a get-out-of-jail free card and a multi-million dollar payout.

Perhaps the only benefit to this episode is that it has revealed the wide fissure between Canada's dinosaur mainstream media and the people in whose interest they purport to act.

The media is almost uniformly supportive of the Trudeau/Khadr payout and apology. This places them at odds with 71 percent of the Canadian public, from all political stripes, who are disgusted with the deal. Despite a media so invested in the Khadr stakes that they condescend to and insult those who disagree with them, they have remained entirely unconvincing. At least there's some comfort in seeing that the average Canadian refuses to be told what to think by posturing nitwits in the media.

Khadr is not, not has he ever been a victim of Canada. He and his family have done nothing but exploit Canada and been a burden on the country since their arrival. Yet he has legions of useful idiot supporters here who have formed a veritable cult around him.And with payout money from the Trudeau government,  likely in part to buy silence in their complicity with events surrounding that family, Canadians continue to pay the price for admitting that clan of terrorists. Even if Khadr had been awarded funds from a Canadian court for violation of his Charter rights, the notion that it would be more than a small fraction of the ten and a half million hush money he received from Trudeau is absurd.

Meanwhile, the family of Christopher Speer continues to feel the loss of the husband and father who Omar Khadr took from them, and now whose memory he continues to insult.


Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Scott Adams explains why Trump keeps winning

Terry Glavin: Khadr's payout looks to Canadians like it's burying a Liberal scandal


We’re still in the early innings, but it would appear that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s pieties about the sanctity of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms aren’t quite a match for the blowback over his government’s decision to cough up $10.5 million and an apology in a secret deal with Guantanamo Bay’s loudly-argued-about former inmate, Omar Khadr.

It turns out that Canadians are so put off by the arrangement — 71 per cent of respondents in an in-depth Angus Reid public opinion survey say it was the wrong thing to do — that three in five Liberals, even, agree with Conservative leader Andrew Scheer that the case should have been fought in court, to the end.

Unsurprisingly, Conservative-leaning voters are the most likely to express revulsion about the deal, which was leaked to the news media last week. The agreement settles a lawsuit Khadr’s lawyers filed in 2004 alleging that Canadian officials collaborated with U.S. military interrogators at Guantanamo in a way that “offends the most basic Canadian standards about the treatment of detained youth suspects,” in the words of a 2010 Supreme Court of Canada ruling. 
The Angus Reid poll found 91 per cent of Conservative voters said the Trudeau government did the “wrong thing” in settling with Khadr. But 61 per cent of Liberals took the same view, and 64 per cent of New Democrats also agreed that the government “should have fought the case and left it to the courts to decide.” That is precisely what Conservative leader Andrew Scheer has been saying.

The public mood should not be expected to soften unless Trudeau manages to dispel the impression that the deal was a kind of hush-money arrangement, designed to make the Khadr problem go away and head off the scandal that would inevitably emerge from the evidence in a hard-fought court trial...